United Nations tries to ban mercury in vaccines; AAP and WHO fight to keep it

[SaneVax: According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “All forms of mercury are quite toxic, and each form exhibits different health effects.” Consider the fact that no safety tests have ever been conducted on the use of thimerosal (a mercury compound) in vaccines – it has been presumed safe, despite being banned in many countries. In the interest of public health and safety, these  two facts alone are reason enough for the United Nations to call for a world-wide ban on its use. Why are the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) and the World Health Organization asking for an exemption on mercury in vaccines? Read the article below and decide for yourself.

Protect Your Children – The AAP and WHO Want to Keep Poisonous Mercury in Vaccines

By Jennifer Hutchinson, VacTruth.com

Thimerosal in vaccines

Thimerosal in vaccines?

We know that mercury is a toxin. We know that it was removed from most vaccines more than a decade ago. End of story, right? Wrong. The debate has resurfaced. If the AAP and the WHO have their way and can successfully influence the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), some vaccines will still contain thimerosal.

The UNEP, as part of an effort to reduce mercury exposure, is considering banning thimerosal worldwide. The AAP and the WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization are asking the UN to reconsider. Their statements are included in the online version of the January issue of Pediatrics. Although you can’t read the article without purchasing it, you can see a summary of the recommendations on the WHO’s website. [1]

According to the AAP, multi-dose vials that contain thimerosal are used for vaccines in developing countries where money and other resources are scant. The thimerosal prevents contamination. Louis Z. Cooper, MD, says, “As many as 84 million children globally are dependent on vaccines whose safe distribution requires availability of thimerosal as a preservative.” In the United States, only one childhood vaccine (influenza) contains thimerosal, and several others have “trace amounts.” [2]

That last statement comes directly from the AAP website. However, according to the CDC chart of vaccine ingredients, thimerosal is in more than one childhood vaccine: the Td (Decavac) and Flulaval (with no mention of multi-dose vials for either); the Meningococcal MPSVR Menomune and Fluzone (multi-dose vials only); trace amounts in the DT (Sanofi), DTaP (Tripedia), and Td (Mass Biologics), with no mention of multi-dose vials; and Fluvirin (multi-dose vials, trace only in prefilled syringes). [3]

The WHO has tried to tell other countries that the amount of mercury is “extremely small,” and if disposed of properly the release of mercury is minimal. The organization cites numerous problems involved in removing thimerosal from all vaccines (making them all single-dose), from affecting “the quality, safety, and efficacy of vaccines” to—obviously—finding an alternative preservative. Then, there are the issues of manufacturing, storage, waste disposal, supply interruption, unavailability of some vaccines, and “a high risk of serious disruption to routine immunization programs and mass immunization campaigns … with a predictable and sizable increase in mortality, for exceedingly limited environmental benefit.” [4]

For an excellent rebuttal of all the WHO’s arguments, see the Coalition for Mercury-Free Drugs website. [5]

 

Read the entire article here.

 

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