Are Vaccines Creating Superbugs?

[SaneVax:  A research team from the University of Georgia is working on the development of a new vaccine for mumps because there are currently 12 genotypes of mumps virus circulating around the globe. In fact, the mumps outbreaks in 2006 and 2010, which occurred primarily in the vaccinated population of the United States, were a result of genotype G of the mumps virus, not genotype A which is the vaccine relevant type of mumps virus.

This brings up a multitude of questions. Why did the traditional media not report these outbreaks could not be controlled with the vaccine currently available? Why did the CDC recommend more vaccinations with a vaccine they clearly should have known would not be effective? Does the suppression of currently circulating viruses via vaccinations encourage mutations that may lead to super-viruses? Are we repeating  the history of MRSA and other antibiotic resistant bacteria which were created by the over-use of antibiotics? Has anyone ever examined the possibility?]

UGA researchers developing new vaccine to fight resurging mumps virus

By UGA News Service

Emerging Threats?

Mumps may seem like a disease of a bygone era to many people in the U.S. who, thanks to immunization programs, have been spared the fever, aches and characteristic swollen jawline of the once common viral infection. Biao He, a University of Georgia professor of infectious diseases and a Georgia Research Alliance distinguished investigator in the College of Veterinary Medicine, worries that a new strain of the virus is spreading, and it could lead to the widespread reintroduction of mumps. Now, thanks in part a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, He and his team are working on a new vaccine to stop it.

Although not typically a life-threatening disease, mumps can lead to serious health problems such as viral meningitis, hearing loss and pancreatitis; and it can cause miscarriage during early pregnancy.

Vaccinations diminished the number of cases dramatically, and at one point it appeared that the U.S. was on pace to eradicate the disease. But two large outbreaks of the virus in 2006 and 2010 involving thousands of confirmed cases in the Midwest and Northeast put the hope of eradication on hold. He is concerned that the current vaccine, which has been in use since 1967, may be showing signs of weakness.

“The virus is always evolving and mutating, and new viruses will emerge,” He said.  “It’s only a matter of time until the old vaccine we have doesn’t work.”

Read the entire article here.

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